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Extreme Heat Predicted for Thursday and Friday

Heat indexes may exceed 100 degrees, leading to raised risk of heat illnesses.

[Update: 9:40 a.m.]

Brookline's Emergency Management Team is opening the following sites as cooling centers in response to the excessive heat warnings.

The following is pulled from an Emergency Management Team press release (attached):  

For residents of 61 Park Street, 90 Longwood Avenue, 50 Pleasant Street, 190 Harvard Street, the  will have their air conditioned community rooms available for residents.

The Brookline Pool, 60 Tappan Street, also is open. During “open swim” hours, Brookline residents can use the pool free of charge during a heat alert. Please call 617-713-5435 for specific hours.

Cooling Centers


Community Room

350 Washington Street 24 hrs a day, 7 days a week 93 Winchester Street Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. 361 Washington St Monday through Thursday, 10am-9pmFriday, 10 am-5 pm 31 Pleasant St Monday and Wednesday: 10am-6pm,Tuesday and Thursday: 10am-9pm,Friday and Saturday: 9:30am to 5 pm. 959 West Roxbury Parkway Monday and Wednesday: 1-9 pm,Tuesday and Thursday: 10am-6pm,Friday 10 am- 5 pm

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The National Weather Service is predicting high temperatures to reach the mid to upper 90s Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and issued an excessive heat watch for the area.

Local meteorologists from WHDH Ch. 7 are predicting highs will be near 100 Thursday and Friday. Humidity levels are expected to be oppresive all three days.

The combination of high temperatures and high humidity will cause heat indexes to soar, making it feel 105 degrees or hotter.

Because of this, people are advised to take caution while outdoors to avoid heat illnesses.

“A few common sense measures can reduce heat-related problems, especially for the elderly, the very young and people with respiratory ailments, who are more susceptible to the effects of high temperatures,” said MEMA Director Kurt Schwartz on its website

Here are some tips to follow during hot, humid weather:

  • Slow down, avoid strenuous activity. Do not try to do too much on a hot day.
  • Wear lightweight, loose-fitting, light-colored clothing. Light colors will reflect heat and sunlight and help maintain normal body temperature. Protect your face with a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Drink plenty of water regularly and often, even if you do not feel thirsty. Attempt to stay hydrated.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages. They can actually dehydrate your body.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, regular meals. Avoid high protein foods that increase metabolic heat.
  • Stay indoors as much as possible. 
  • If you do not have air conditioning, stay on your lowest floor, out of the sun.  Electric fans do not cool the air, but they do help evaporate perspiration, which cools your body.
  • Go to a place where you can get relief from the heat, such as air conditioned schools, libraries, theaters and other community facilities that may offer refuge during the warmest times of the day.
  • Check with your community for information about possible local "cooling centers."
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings or louvers. Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80%.
  • Avoid too much sunshine. Sunburn slows the skin’s ability to cool itself. If you are outside, use sunscreen lotion with a high SPF (Sun Protection Factor) rating.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in a closed vehicle.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors.

WHDH is also predicting for the possibility of thunderstorms Friday and Saturday.

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